1960 Evinrude 10 HP

Discussion in 'Bubba's Outboards' started by codeman, Feb 2, 2006.

  1. codeman

    codeman New Member

    Messages:
    1
    State:
    South Carolina
    I have a 60 model 10 hp engine. It's been sitting up for about 6 years. I got it out the other day and managed to crank it. it runs but not smoothly. I want to put it in the shop for service and get a good tune up and carb kit. I think i should go ahead and get a new waterpump and all new oils etc. For the mentioned work as well as anything else you think i should replace, what should i expect the service charge to be? I'm not looking for an exact amount at all just ballpark if you can do that.

    Thanks codeman
     
  2. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    If you can find a tech that will work on that engine around here it would be hard to find. It would cost you about 65 and hour plus parts.
    I don't mean to be harsh but when and engine has set that long there are certain percautions you need to take before you even roll the crank over.

    If you want to do it your self let me know ans I'll walk you through it.
    If you can handle a wrench any at all you can do this.

    When you mix fuel be sure to mix it at 24:1 with any good TCW-3 oil and 87 or better octane gas.

    I have an article in my files on how to wake a sleeping out board if you want it.
     

  3. fisherdude

    fisherdude New Member

    Messages:
    34
    State:
    Arkansas
    I have owned and worked on several Evinrude motors of that vintage and offer the following for your consideration.

    Pull the plugs and check the compression. Hopefully, it is over 100 lbs in each cylinder and about the same from one to the other. I had a 10 that would run at 70 psi, but fuel economy and power were poor and I finally scrapped it for parts.

    New points would be something I would put in if this hasn't been done very recently. In any event, check their setting - 0.020 inch as I recall.

    New spark plugs of course. also check the plug wires, I have had these be troublesome on my 10 hp.

    A new water pump impeller is practically a must.

    Check the lower unit for water leakage. New seals here may be in order.

    A carb kit is probably indicated, at least take it apart and clean it. Dirty carbs/jets is the most common problem with motors of this vintage. Sometimes, I have to clean the carb 2 or 3 times on an old motor because it takes a while to get the trash out of the lines. Check the fuel filter or bowl and all the fuel lines. Replace fuel lines if not in good condition. I use an inline fuel filter.

    These old Evinrudes wil practically run forever if they have oil in the fuel.
    Good luck with your project!
     
  4. fisherdude

    fisherdude New Member

    Messages:
    34
    State:
    Arkansas
    This is in response to a PM from codeman, but the system won't let me reply directly for some reason. However, someone else might be interested in the answer as well. Codeman was asking how to repair a leaky fuel fitting on an old 3 prong evinrude fuel fitting. Those old Evinrude connections used special fat O-Rings that I think you can still get from an Evinrude dealer. I had exactly the same problem and my Evinrude dealer had some new O-rings. You just dig out the old ones that have become hardened and worn over time and push in the new ones. You should lube the new ones with a little oil to help them push in. If you will watch ebay, you can probably find a parts manual and a repair manual for your motor. Thats where I got mine.
     
  5. Cattracker16

    Cattracker16 New Member

    Messages:
    356
    State:
    Wilton Iowa
    only reason i could see in putting any money into a older motor like that is... 1 it's grandpas old motor.... 2 your doing a restore on an old boat and are trying to keep it real authentic... thats just my opinion.. i'd reather have a newer motor kenny
     
  6. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    That motor ain't old.
    I have one that dated back to 1946 and still ticks right along.
    Those older motors were some of the toughest on the market.

    I doubt if there is a motor made in the last five years that will last 40 years.