12V Question

Discussion in 'Bubba's Outboards' started by miichael, Nov 4, 2006.

  1. miichael

    miichael New Member

    Messages:
    380
    State:
    North Carolina
    Got a question for you guys. I want to run some of my 12V equipment in my house but i want to use 110 to power it. I know i can get converters to convert 110 AC to 12v DC. My question is how many amps does it need to be? They make 12V 300MA all way to 12V 1000MA. How many amps should i get to power a 12v electronic. Most batteries have different cranking amps so does it matter? i was thinking a 12V DC 500MA would do the job. What do you guys think?
     
  2. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I think you need to check the appliances you will be running on the 12V system to determine the ampreage required. Best err on the side of caution.
     

  3. miichael

    miichael New Member

    Messages:
    380
    State:
    North Carolina
    i looked at it like this using these 2 cig lighter plugs. GPS calls for 12V 500MA while cell phone calls for 12V 300MA but they both work fine on a 12V battery. So what would the battery be putting out? how many amps? you dont need a 500ma battery to run the gps and a 300 ma battery to run cell phone so why cant you run everything off 1 converter since the 12v battery isn't putting out the same amps as what it calls for? maybe there's something I'm missing?
     
  4. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    Mike, the amp requirement for the unit(s) you are using is in reference to the minimuin power requirement for the unit(s). As long as you fuse each unit accordingly, you won't hurt the unit by having more power there than you need. It's like plugging in a 100w bulb on a 15 amp circut. Doesn't hurt the bulb. Doesn't hurt the circut. If you however put more load on the circut than it can handle, say two 1500w heaters you overload the curcut and the fuse/breaker blows/trips. Go a little larger than you need and make sure each piece of equipment is fused protected. For instance almost all electronics has a fuse inline somewhere. Long as you use the spec required fuse, and don't roll up a piece of alum. foil or something silly like that you won't have any trouble. What you need to watch out for is that your 1 amp power supply has a 1 amp fuse. The individual appliances are rated for their use....like the 100w bulb. Make sense? Hope this helps.
     
  5. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    You said the GPS used 500MA and the phone used 300MA.

    If you plan to use both the GPS and phone make sure the converters rated output is 12 Volt and for at least 800MA. 1000MA = 1 AMP
     
  6. miichael

    miichael New Member

    Messages:
    380
    State:
    North Carolina
    OK now that makes a lot more sense. I didn't know what you was using only took enough power it needs. What about a bilge pump? it will draw every bit of power it can right? so would it work and be safe?
     
  7. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    There again it will have it's requirements also. For instance I have a small boat, small pump. Mine is 12v, 1.5amp. When I wired it in, I used an automotive cartridge fuse holder on the hot side and put a 2amp fuse in it. That protects the pump and wiring,(14ga), from overload. If I get garbage in the impeller an it loads up, the fuse blows instead of the motor winding or the wiring overheating. Fuses are cheap compared to a new pump. All you are doing is protecting yer branch circuts. Everything is a step down from what the source can provide, to protect the individual appliance. Look under yer truck hood at the main panel. Say 60 amps, ignition fuse, 40 amp panel (supply) fuse. Then on the panel in the cab, 20 amp lights, 5 amps dash & instruments, 20 amps cigarette lighter, & so forth....all labeled by what appliances and size wire in service. In yer deal the devices are protected of themselves so all you need do is fuse yer power supply to protect it, the power supply, so it doen't overheat. 1 amp power supply, 1 amp fuse on the load side. Yer displays are lit.
     
  8. miichael

    miichael New Member

    Messages:
    380
    State:
    North Carolina
    ok may be a stupid question but where do i find a 1A 12v fuse? i found a 3a 32V and a 1A 250V. i cant find a 12V 1A fuse. where do i look?
     
  9. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    Auto Parts stores. Michael, I would strongly suggest that you visit an electronics store such as Radio Shack before you purchase a converter. They can answer those questions. You can damage that equipment by using too little power.
     
  10. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    West Marine shows them in their catalog, a local NAPA may also carry them.

    I'll pass along a simple "rule" that I learned....Voltage is supply & Amperage is demand. So your battery is your power supply and all or any devices that you connect to it will be where your Amperage draw(current) is created.

    HTH, Elliot
     
  11. bw19

    bw19 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    Texas
    Radio Shack sells a nice 4-6 amp regulated power supply, runs off 110v and supplies 12v output to both terminals and to a cigarette lighter plug. I use one in the house to power my GPS when I upload waypoints to the PC. I pied $25 for mine a couple years ago.

    You can also use your 12volt battery charger as a 12v power supply. Just wire a cigarette lighter plug to the terminals.