12 drivers in chase

Discussion in 'Wolfman's Nascar Pit Stop' started by smokey, Jan 9, 2007.

  1. smokey

    smokey New Member

    Messages:
    1,876
    State:
    Tennessee
    This years chase will have 12 drivers instead of ten ,and 10 more points will be given to the winner of races.I think that will make the chase more competive and wont punish I driver for getting into a crash and wipeing him out of the championship.I dont think there will be as much points racing. drivers will want those extra points for winning. Any thoughts on this?
    smokey
     
  2. ryang

    ryang Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,290
    State:
    Blacklick, Ohio
    Name:
    Gary
    While more is better I think they all should have a chance to win unless they are out of it points wise. I hate the last 10 races as they have been with the points. I do think that the teams will think a little harder about winning tho which should make it more challanging.
     

  3. beetle

    beetle New Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    Ohio
    I think the ones in the chase make way too much issue with people not in the chase trying to win. The better they place the more sponsor money they get even if they are not in the chase. Some teams are having a real hard time competing against the Roush and Hendrick teams. I wish they would change it to one car teams only. And I think that a driver should only be allowed to drive in one division [cup,busch,truck,etc] give some others a chance.
     
  4. wolfman

    wolfman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,081
    State:
    Triadelphia, WV
    Name:
    Walter Flack
    My thought are this:

    There should be a qualification to get into the chase of the final 10 races.
    For example (1) the top 10 drivers in the points should be in the chase just like it is now. (2) If a driver is not in the top 10 but has won a race during that same season, he should get an automatic pass to the chase. (3) Any additional drivers that are not in the top 10 or has not won a race but has at least 3 top ten finishes in that same season should be in the chase.(4) any of the above must have competed in at least 24 of the 26 events before the chase starts. This will rule out the road course aces or partial season runners that might just get in by winning a race without running the full season.

    From the numbers that I have crunched together this should be from around 15 to 20 contenders for the chase, in which these are usually the top 15-20 in points also.
     
  5. tufffish

    tufffish New Member

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    1,196
    State:
    Texas
    i think that 10 drivers are enough with an exception for anyone that has won a race should be allowed in. the way the cars are now one win in a season is very good. i am a hendrick motor sport guy, but it is not right for an owner to have more than 3 cars. if nascar is not careful they could end up like irl with only 5 or so owners and look what happens, not enough cars to fill the field.
     
  6. pokerkat

    pokerkat New Member

    Messages:
    31
    State:
    Ohio
    I honestly think that Mark Martin should have won one championship lol he came close so many times, his son for sure will, I got to meet them both, btw I am a huge NASCAR fan, I have tons of memorabilia of about every driver other than Jeff Gordon and Dale Earnhardt Sr., could get Sr. cause I didn't like Nascar before '01, no offense is meant by that in any way too, and Jeff Gordon just won't sign lol, I got tons of legends to sign a nice flag I bought a while back, from Richard Petty to Harry Gant to Bobby Allison, awesome aweomse legends, this new 12 person chase does make it more of a challenge, I don't have a problem with any points system that has ever been created, I liked the old one better but hey as long as I get to see the race thats fine by me ya know.
     
  7. slimcat

    slimcat New Member

    Messages:
    952
    State:
    marion kentucky
    I guess this is the Tony STewart rule. He couldn't get in last year, so they make it where the top names can still make it with sucky seasons.LOL
     
  8. billcatfish

    billcatfish New Member

    Messages:
    1,571
    State:
    evansville Ind
    YESyes but if you do the math on it back to the old school way then see who would have won yes the big old number 20
     
  9. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,160
    State:
    NC
    Who cares.

    They all play by the same rules.

    There are only about five guys who have a shot, the rest are for show.

    Major sponsors want the media time and TV wants viewers watching their drivers.
     
  10. slimcat

    slimcat New Member

    Messages:
    952
    State:
    marion kentucky
    I guess If Dale Jr. can't make the top 12, they will make it the top 15 drivers.LOL.:roll_eyes:
     
  11. wolfman

    wolfman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,081
    State:
    Triadelphia, WV
    Name:
    Walter Flack
    Beginning this season, the Chase will have 12 drivers -- up from 10 -- and the field will be seeded based on "regular-season" victories.

    "We believe the Chase accomplished the original goal -- it made racing more competitive, made every race ... mean more and created more excitement," NASCAR chairman Brian France said.

    "The key issue for us today is the intersection between winning and consistency."

    It starts in the 26-race "regular season," where wins now will be worth 185 points. That's up five points from years past, and assuming the winning driver also picks up other bonuses during the race, a victory can be worth as much as 25 points more than second place.

    In addition, those wins will be worth a 10-point bonus that will be used to "seed" the drivers when the 10-race Chase begins.

    During the Chase's first three years, the drivers' point totals were reset in five-point increments when the postseason began. Now, all drivers' totals will be reset to 5,000, and each will receive a 10-point bonus for each victory during the first 26 races.

    In other words, Kahne would have received 50 points in bonuses and started last year's Chase in first place.

    And, with the field now at 12 drivers, Tony Stewart and Greg Biffle both would have qualified.

    The final outcome wouldn't have changed, though: Jimmie Johnson still would have won the Nextel Cup title, but Stewart would have finished in second place -- 16 points out.

    France said the sanctioning body struggled with the numbers before finalizing this new version of the Chase.

    "We looked at 10 points, 25 points, 50 points -- we looked at what that might do," France said. "What we found is, how delicate it is between the balance of winning and consistency and how careful we have (to be) to get that just right. We believe adding an additional five points (to race wins) strikes the best balance between winning and consistency."

    Reaction to the changes was mixed.

    "I'm happy to see NASCAR increase the points for a winning a race -- it makes winning that much more important, and after all, winning is what this sport is all about," said car owner Richard Childress, who placed two drivers in the Chase last season.

    Carl Edwards, who finished third in the 2005 Chase but failed to qualify last year, said the new system should make drivers more aggressive.

    "Let's say it's three races to go until the Chase and we were second in points and everything looked great, like there's no way we can finish worse than 12th in the points," he said. "I'll guarantee you we'll go harder for those wins because now all you're racing for is 10-point bonuses to start the playoffs with.

    "You'll be hard-pressed to find anybody in the garage who isn't going for wins."

    But in expanding the field by another two drivers, Texas Motor Speedway president Eddie Gossage wondered if it doesn't dilute the competition.

    "Long term, NASCAR has to make sure that they don't go too far and water down the playoff field like we have seen in other sports," Gossage said.

    France launched the Chase in 2004 to create a championship format similar to other professional leagues, and to drum up interest in NASCAR during the stretch of the season that competes with the NFL for TV ratings. The original format called for the top 10 drivers -- and anyone within 400 points of the leader -- to advance to a 10-race countdown to the Nextel Cup title.

    The first season was a success, with five drivers entering the season finale with a mathematical chance to win the title. Kurt Busch beat Johnson by eight points in the closest finish in NASCAR history.

    NASCAR was slightly disappointed in Year 2, when Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Jeff Gordon -- the sport's two most marketable drivers -- failed to make the Chase. Stewart, meanwhile, used a cautious and consistent strategy to win the title.

    Johnson won the Chase this past season, battling back after a regular-season crash dropped him to ninth in the standings.

    Long before last year's Chase even began, France announced plans to tweak the system. He wasn't sure what he planned to do but repeatedly said he wasn't looking at widening the field.

    Apparently that changed.

    It's possible NASCAR always expected the field to occasionally include more than 10 drivers. The trouble was, no driver outside the top 10 was ever within 400 points of the leader. Now, that 400-point cushion has been scrapped.

    Despite criticism from longtime fans who preferred the consistency-based championship format, France said he still believes the Chase is the best thing for NASCAR.

    "The Chase has been successful because it has done what it was designed to do -- give more drivers an opportunity to win the championship," France said. "It has re-energized our sport. And now, a good thing is about to get better.

    "In 2004 when we unveiled the Chase, we said we would keep a close eye on it, and make adjustments if needed. We have done that, and we feel like the sport -- and the sport's fans -- will benefit."