How to tell a catfish's age?


Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28
  1. #1
    *Required*
    Larry H.'s Avatar
    Member Since
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Mineral Springs,*State*
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default How to tell a catfish's age?

    Is there any way to approximate a cats age?


  2. #2
    Clarence Cremea
    Desperado's Avatar
    Member Since
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pataskala, Ohio
    Posts
    1,229
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm not sure ,but get a hold of the DNR and they could get you to someone who would know.


  3. #3
    Jack Holsky
    Netmanjack's Avatar
    Member Since
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3,734
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Larry,
    If you can lift it over your head with one hand, its between One and Five years old. If it takes two hands to lift it over your head, then its Five to
    Ten years old. If you cant get its tail off the ground, then its Ten to Twenty years old. And finally, if you cant get it out of the water, its to old to mess with, so just cut your line and hope someone believes your story! :0a10:

  4. #4
    paul

    Member Since
    Aug 2005
    Location
    abrerdeen md
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default old fish

    Netmanjack of all the ways i heard to tell the age of a fish i relly think yours is the most correct. The way i do it is young cats hert when grabed wrong older cats finds are a lot duller.I will ask my boss just how you realy tell age because all i realy is size and limet. :rolleyes:

  5. #5
    *Required*
    Larry H.'s Avatar
    Member Since
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Mineral Springs,*State*
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Netmanjack
    Larry,
    If you can lift it over your head with one hand, its between One and Five years old. If it takes two hands to lift it over your head, then its Five to
    Ten years old. If you cant get its tail off the ground, then its Ten to Twenty years old. And finally, if you cant get it out of the water, its to old to mess with, so just cut your line and hope someone believes your story! :0a10:

    I dont know about all of that...

  6. #6
    paul

    Member Since
    Aug 2005
    Location
    abrerdeen md
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default age

    Sorry it took so long to get back here but i ask several fellow officers and i am sorry to say i got the same answer you have to ask a biolagest :0a15:

  7. #7
    Josh Davidson
    maddcatter's Avatar
    Member Since
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Newark, Oh
    Posts
    614
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Just this year a 92lb blue was caught and aged at 11yrs old. This seemed to shock a lot of fish biologists. They say the only accurate way to test the age of a fish is to closely examine a certain part of the fish. And the only way to do that is to kill the fish.

  8. #8
    *Required*
    Larry H.'s Avatar
    Member Since
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Mineral Springs,*State*
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BAITFISH
    Thats an easy question, you politly ask them, unless there female.
    :0a24:

    :D

    Larry H.

  9. #9
    *Required*
    Larry H.'s Avatar
    Member Since
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Mineral Springs,*State*
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maddcatter
    Just this year a 92lb blue was caught and aged at 11yrs old. This seemed to shock a lot of fish biologists. They say the only accurate way to test the age of a fish is to closely examine a certain part of the fish. And the only way to do that is to kill the fish.
    Oh okay Thankyou

    Larry

  10. #10
    Matt
    Fishgeek's Avatar
    Member Since
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,148
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Catfish can be aged by taking a cross-section of their pectoral fin spines. If someone knows what they are doing he/she can literally dislocate the spine from the fish's shoulder and yank it off. It leaves a nasty-looking hole where the spine used to be but catfish are tough. Studies have shown that there is really no detrimental effect to the fish's survival after the spine is removed.

    Anyway, biologists can cut a thin cross-section (using a jeweler's saw) of the spine, look at it under a dissecting scope, and count the rings...very similar to aging a tree. For fish with scales, you count the rings on their scales.

    Madcatter is correct about killing fish for the best age estimate. Biologists use a fish's ear bones, called otoliths, to get the most accurate ages. Obviously a trade-off...and usually a lot more work!

    Last edited by Fishgeek; 09-10-2005 at 01:08 AM.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •