Sweet Corn Blowing Over


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  1. #1
    Festus

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    Default Sweet Corn Blowing Over

    I usually grow either Silver or Golden Queen corn. It is really bad to get blown over during strong winds. It can be straightened, of course, I just hate wading mud over my ankles after a big storm. What is an alternative variety with a good taste that is less prone to this problem? We don't really care for the supersweet varieties.


  2. #2
    Michael Craig
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    Festus you have planted some of the best varieties out there.Strong winds will have the same effect on most varieties. The only thing that might help is making bigger hills to start with. One year we had them blown down two times, and my father cut some cane and tied them up. When wind can blow trees down the corn is no match.

    IT ONLY TAKES ONE CAST--MY DAY WILL COME

  3. #3
    Festus

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    You're right there, Mickey. Usually it's more prone to blow down during a dry growing season, then there's a big storm and the ground is mucky. Shallow rooted corn, I guess.

  4. #4
    Mark
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    Plant it deeper. I had this problem a couple years in a row. Then the next year I planted a little deeper, and when the corn was about a foot high I built the dirt up around the stalk. It really helped.

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    Mark Johnson
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    Quote Originally Posted by festus View Post
    I usually grow either Silver or Golden Queen corn. It is really bad to get blown over during strong winds. It can be straightened, of course, I just hate wading mud over my ankles after a big storm. What is an alternative variety with a good taste that is less prone to this problem? We don't really care for the supersweet varieties.
    I found the cure for that.
    Don't plant so early. The best gardens I've ever had were early to middle May gardens.
    Ground is good and warm. It jumps up like a rocket.
    The spring winds are gone.

  6. #6
    Festus

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    Yep, I always wait until May. Then 2 weeks later I make a second planting. Corn planted in April is too slow.

  7. #7
    Mark Johnson
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    I want corn to jump. When you plant in that warm during the day and cool at night weather it doesn't get the jump needed to overcome the crows.
    They'll be out there plucking the young corn up and eating the nut off the root.

    Got a dead sure cure for crows too. Old man taught me this and I thought he was nuts but I tried it.
    Eased on down the side of the field where crows were roosting and waited for one to fly out over the field. Took him down with a 12 guage.
    Haul him up to the garden and tie him to the end of a 14 foot 4x4 by his feet. stand the pole up and plant it.
    The rest of the crows will raise holy hell for about 30 minutes (holding a funeral) and then they'll move on. Just leave him hanging and the crow problem is over.

  8. #8
    Festus

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    That must really work because I know other people who use that trick. There are crows in the area but I've never had a problem with them.

  9. #9
    N. W. Brown
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    If your corn just bends over with the roots still intact and the stalk not broken most
    times it will strighten itself when it gets several days of sun. I used to do the same
    thing you did and that is alot of work strightening each stalk. An old nieghbor of mine
    told me to leave it alone and it strighten itself and I thought no way but it did.

  10. #10
    Randall
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poppa View Post
    If your corn just bends over with the roots still intact and the stalk not broken most
    times it will strighten itself when it gets several days of sun. I used to do the same
    thing you did and that is alot of work strightening each stalk. An old nieghbor of mine
    told me to leave it alone and it strighten itself and I thought no way but it did.
    That's the truth right there. In fact, by standing it back up you will damage the roots opposite of the way the corn fell and weaken it further. Hilling about 6-8 in or so helps to some degree but when the ground is completely saturated with water it can still be blown over. This happens to my sweet corn once or twice a season. It's terrifying to behold but if you just ignore it and look at it in 3-4 days, it will be standing right back up the way nature intended.


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