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pond / lake turnover

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  1. #1
    Billy

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    Default pond / lake turnover

    I have been fishing a local reservoir / small lake for several years - except for this year - been a very good spot for flatheads and channel cat. Sometime this spring - it had a major fish kill and was closed by IDNR for most of the fishing season. Officially - no word was given for the kill - so I have avoided enjoying this particular spot. I got word from another guy that used to hit this as well that seems it was deemed lake turnover. I researched it and found alot of info on this phenomenen. But I didn't find alot of info about how it affected the remaining fish. Can anyone share their experience with this?

    I really have missed fishing this place as it is very secluded and always produces some very interesting catches...hope someone can help!!:0a21:


  2. #2
    Brian Hupp
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    Depends on the reason for the turnover and fish kill would be my guess. The IDNR probably wants to send biologists to take water samples and figure out the reasons before fish are taken out of it. It could be a toxin or polluted run off from a farmer field or something along those lines that could have been the reason.


  3. #3
    Billy

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    Yep - that was the first thing I thought of too. But apparently this wasn't the case - a natural phenom - just haven't really seen this occur.

  4. #4
    JEFFRO
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    local lake here had a simular problem and i was told it was a turnover, but then golden algae(most likely) then newspaper said it was fertilizer run off :roll_eyes:, newspaper had 0 facts to back it up and caused a big scare with people being afraid to eat the fish, and here we are a few months later, people still eating the fish and are just fine..i dont know what it is..hopefully your situation gets a better answer than mine has

  5. #5
    Brian Hupp
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    Well, lake turnovers is a seasonal thing from the changes of water temperatures and the bio in the water. Deals with oxygen and sulphur gases all changing around causing heck to the fish.

    Now, I wonder if it was too hot of water. You said it wa sa pond, so it is probably very shallow. We had some run of very hot days that could have put a hurting on the fish and inabilitity to gain the oxygen needed. Is there a bubble pump/airation out in this pond to help in this case?

    Also.. thinking further of this... the IDNR may want the remaining fish to remain in the water and not taken out so it can repopulate itself without forcing a costly restocking program of dumping a bunch of fingerlings if they can avoid it. Given the DNR and many fisheries are hurting for funds.

    Be interesting to hear more if/when you find it.

  6. #6
    Billy

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    actually this is about (guessing) a 10 acre reservoir or bigger. The same thing as mentioned - no newspaper or news line concerning what happened - just the intial report of a major fish kill - not alot of fields around it or livestock...this is the explanation I heard from a local fellow fisherman. I think I will give it to next year before hitting this hols again:beat_shot:

  7. #7
    Kevin
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    I've never heard of turnover producing a fish kill. Turnover happens in northern lakes every spring and fall. Here's a good definition from the MN DNR's website:

    What is meant by "lake turnover"? How and why do lakes do this in autumn and spring?

    • The key to this question is how water density varies with water temperature. Water is most dense (heaviest) at 39 F (4 C) and as temperature increases or decreases from 39 F, it becomes increasingly less dense (lighter). In summer and winter, lakes are maintained by climate in what is called a stratified condition. Less dense water is at the surface and more dense water is near the bottom.
    • During late summer and autumn, air temperatures cool the surface water causing its density to increase. The heavier water sinks, forcing the lighter, less dense water to the surface. This continues until the water temperature at all depths reaches approximately 39 F. Because there is very little difference in density at this stage, the waters are easily mixed by the wind. The sinking action and mixing of the water by the wind results in the exchange of surface and bottom waters which is called "turnover."
    • During spring, the process reverses itself. This time ice melts, and surface waters warm and sink until the water temperature at all depths reaches approximately 39 F. The sinking combined with wind mixing causes spring "turnover."

    A more likely cause of a fish kill is lack of dissolved oxygen, or a toxic spill of some kind. Northern lakes often experience a fish kill when snow covered ice prevents sunlight penetration. Weeds die off producing CO2. Oxygen levels drop below the point to sustain fish life. When the lake thaws, fish carcasses litter the shoreline. It often will kill all the fish in a small lake or pond.

  8. #8
    Billy

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    I believe this to be true - thanks

  9. #9
    Brian Hupp
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    I know the lake at Scott Air Force Base has had problems time and time again with weeds and underwater growth becoming such a problem that once it surfaced, it blocked out sunlight and depleted O2. They tried to toss in some aerators but ya... that was like shooting a BB at a freight train. As a result... that fishery is long gone.

  10. #10
    Billy

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    all I can hope for in this situation is for the fishing not to be hurt for several years to come - just have to wait it out...probably won't hit this one until next year the way it looks now....:0a32:


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