flat bottom or v hull


View Poll Results: whitch is best for the river

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  • v hull

    127 49.22%
  • flat bottom

    131 50.78%
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  1. #1
    Dallas Barnwell
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    Default flat bottom or v hull

    ok i am kinda starting to look at used boats agen i have desided to junk the old fiberglass job i got it is to heavy to much work needed and for what a motor big enoufh to push it i can get one already running i dont mind a fixer uper but i want one thats running my ? is i have always liked a v hull but now that i fish the river all the time i want you guys input i see both v's and flats on the river but give me the pro's and cons


  2. #2
    Larry
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    I run a semi-V and it makes for a much smoother ride in rough current and I can put it anywhere you can put a flatbottom. Not much help against barges though:ooooh::smile2::smile2: It also works great on whitecapping lakes. Stay safe and stick a pig!!!:wink:


  3. #3
    Brian
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    I voted v-hull, but actually prefer modified v. I had a lowe roughnech 1860 mod v, and it was great. Flats were always kinda rough for me, and a little tippy compared to a v or mod-v. I still have an alumionum bass boat mod-v that I use almost entirely for the MO river, however, also use my fathers deep-v as well. Tippy there are not, and as far as smoothness, his is usually better than mine, but only when the waves are really rolling. There have been times on lake of the woods in MN that I was glad we had his as opposed to mine when those waves are pushing 4-5 feet. In the end, a lot of comes down to what you are comfortable with. I've been in boats my whole life, in just about every situation, and about the only boats I don't do are canoes:tounge_out:

  4. #4
    Austin
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    I'm gonna go with V's too. More comfortable ride, and a better bet for bigger water. I have a 14ft. Lowe V hull and it doesn't sit more than a few inches deeper than a jon boat. Ive had that thing in some places that 14ft aluminum boats probably shouldn't go and always came back in one piece. :wink:

  5. #5
    Robert
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    I am not a real fan of a true flat bottom. I mean one that is really flat on the bottom. I have seen them slide sideways in turns and that might put you into a sandbar or drifting log or other boat. I like the aluminum boats that have a slight v on the bottom I think they bite into the water and turn curves tighter.

  6. #6
    Lenny

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    Quote Originally Posted by etexun View Post
    I am not a real fan of a true flat bottom. I mean one that is really flat on the bottom. I have seen them slide sideways in turns and that might put you into a sandbar or drifting log or other boat. I like the aluminum boats that have a slight v on the bottom I think they bite into the water and turn curves tighter.
    thats what my tracker is like and corners great not to mention the 5 inchs of water i can run in :wink:

  7. #7
    Catfish Slayer
    Floyd Scott
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    I have both a 14 ft. v bottom and an 18 ft. flat . I like the flat much better then the v .

  8. #8
    Matt

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    Quote Originally Posted by etexun View Post
    I am not a real fan of a true flat bottom. I mean one that is really flat on the bottom. I have seen them slide sideways in turns and that might put you into a sandbar or drifting log or other boat. I like the aluminum boats that have a slight v on the bottom I think they bite into the water and turn curves tighter.

    My boat is a flatbottom, and she will slide in turns. Its really not a big deal. You slow down before going into a turn and you wont have any trouble. I have had to do evasive maneuvers ( floating boards, logs etc) and its never been an issue there either. As soon as you get off the trottle a little bit, it will turn on a dime again, If there's something you're worried about hitting the first thing you do is try to slow down anyway.

    The flatbottom or V bottom debate depends on a lot of stuff. Flatbottoms are inherently more stable (less tippy) and take less water to float. V bottoms are more comfortable in a chop, but the couple of modified v boats i've been in weren't any better than my flatbottom. You need to ask yourself how big a river you're gonna be on, and what you're expectations are for the boat.

  9. #9
    Mark
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    I have mess with boats, and been in boats most of my life since I was about 12. That would be for the last 39 years.

    My preference is a flat bottom. I fish mostly from a 12ft jon boat. I like her and she rides ok, a little bumpy in rough water, but ok. She is very stable for such a small boat and great for fishing.

    I use her on a medium size river, the upper Monongahela River in Northern West Virginia, mostly. I have been on the Ohio with her, and many small rivers in WV. She is a great boat for small rivers and calm water on big water. Just need to keep an eye on barges and other water traffic. I have use my jon boat in small lakes and ponds.

    If I fished large rivers, like the Ohio, more, I would get a bigger boat, with higher sides so it would be a little more stable in rough water and barge wakes. But I would stick with a flat bottom boat, just because of how stable it is.

    I had a 26 ft. deck boat for a while, a great family fun boat, but not easy to fish from. It was the most stable water platform I have ever seen, better than a pontoon boat. Very rough ride in rough water.

    If I fished on the ocean or in a really big lake, where the wind can make some high waves, I would go with a whaler type boat. Sort of combines the best of both v-hull and flat bottom.

    Hope this helps.

  10. #10
    Mark Johnson
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    A boat is nothing but a series of compromises.
    The easiest way to decide what is for you is with a pencil and piece of paper.

    Write what you want, , what you can live without, where you are going to use the boat.

    I like a flat bottom boat in some bodies of water, but if I try to take that flat bottom out one Saturday to try fishing for something else like in the turning basin at Morehead it's going to be one rough day of fishing. Even with a modified V.
    Flatbottoms aren't bad in all situations, you just have to be willing to crawl sometimes.

    Flat bottoms are a stable platform at rest.
    You have tradeoffs.
    The deep V may ride good but on anchor it some of them rock violently on the keel.

    A progressive V is a trade off. A deep entry that flattens off say to 6% at the stern. You get some of both worlds.

    I have a ton of boat plans and I like every one of them.
    Pencil and paper whittles the field down though .


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